PROJECTING THE PERCEPTION OF CARE AND CONCERN

 

OPINION:
As a resident of a state-run long-term care facility, I’ve been exposed to a management style  much different from my experience in the private sector.

cropped-WORDPRESS-PORTRAIT2.jpg

The most important characteristic of leadership is to convey the perception of competency and concern. Not only in the delivery of the final product or service but for the well-being of those employees that actually perform the one-on-one service. Visible leadership is essential at the time of adversity when employees are asked to perform above and beyond the ordinary. Employees and residents deserve and expect the same from management. To do otherwise creates a disconnect between management and employees and breeds disrespect, doubt and resentment.

During the blizzard of 2016 in Richmond, no member of leadership was on site to offer direction, leadership or control over the operation during the adverse conditions. Employees were told to risk personal safety and property damage to be at work. No “call outs” would be accepted! Confidence and respect towards management were shattered. If employees are considered “essential personnel” leadership, too, must be essential. Otherwise, why do we need management?

Visibility emits not only confidence and competency but concern for the outcome of the task at hand. It brings unity and strength towards the achievement of the goal: the comfort and care of resident veterans. Invisible leadership projects the image of incompetence and indifference.
bc